Train to Pakistan

Train to Pakistan

Book - 1981
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"In the summer of 1947, when the creation of the state of Pakistan was formally announced, ten million people--Muslims and Hindus and Sikhs--were in flight. By the time the monsoon broke, almost a million of them were dead, and all of northern India was in arms, in terror, or in hiding. The only remaining oases of peace were a scatter of little villages lost in the remote reaches of the frontier. One of these villages was Mano Majra."

It is a place, Khushwant Singh goes on to tell us at the beginning of this classic novel, where Sikhs and Muslims have lived together in peace for hundreds of years. Then one day, at the end of the summer, the "ghost train" arrives, a silent, incredible funeral train loaded with the bodies of thousands of refugees, bringing the village its first taste of the horrors of the civil war. Train to Pakistan is the story of this isolated village that is plunged into the abyss of religious hate. It is also the story of a Sikh boy and a Muslim girl whose love endured and transcends the ravages of war.
Publisher: New York : Grove Press, c1981.
ISBN: 9780802132215
0802132219
Branch Call Number: KHUSH
Characteristics: 181 p. ; 18 cm.

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Liber_vermis
Apr 02, 2014

In March 2014 the author died at age 99. With the on-going ethnic and religious disputes in Ukraine and Sudan; and the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Rwanda in April 2014, this gripping novella offers another terrible example of our susceptibility for genocide. The main characters are finely drawn; and the intricate plot moves rapidly to an ending that is both tragic and hopeful. The author has a dry wit that relieves an otherwise depressing and shocking story.

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