How Does It Feel to Be A Problem?

How Does It Feel to Be A Problem?

Being Young and Arab in America

Book - 2008
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The story of how young Arab and Muslim Americans are forging lives for themselves in a country that often mistakes them for the enemy Arab and Muslim Americans are the new, largely undiscussed aproblema of American society, their lives no better understood than those of African Americans a century ago. Under the cover of the terrorist attacks, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the explosion of political violence around the world, a fundamental misunderstanding of the Arab and Muslim American communities has been allowed to fester and even to define the lives of the seven twentysomething men and women whom we meet in this book. Their names are Rami, Sami, Akram, Lina, Yasmin, Omar, and Rasha, and they all live in Brooklyn, New York, which is home to the largest number of Arab Americans in the United States. We meet Sami, an Arab American Christian, who navigates the minefield of associations the public has of Arabs as well as the expectations that Muslim Arab Americans have of him as a marine who fought in the Iraq war. And Rasha, who, along with her parents, sister, and brothers, was detained by the FBI in a New Jersey jail in early 2002. Without explanation, she and her family were released several months later. As drama of all kinds swirls around them, these young men and women strive for the very things the majority of young adults desire: opportunity, marriage, happiness, and the chance to fulfill their potential. But what they have now are lives that are less certain, and more difficult, than they ever could have imagined: workplace discrimination, warfare in their countries of origin, government surveillance, the disappearance of friends or family, threats ofvigilante violence, and a host of other problems that thrive in the age of terror. And yet How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? takes the raw material of their struggle and weaves it into an unforgettable, and very American, story of promise and hope. In prose that is at once blunt and lyrical, Moustafa Bayoumi allows us to see the world as these men and women do, revealing a set of characters and a place that indelibly change the way we see the turbulent past and yet still hopeful future of this country.
Publisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2008.
ISBN: 9781594201769
Branch Call Number: 305.8927073 B361
Characteristics: 290 p.

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StarGladiator
Aug 12, 2016

Here are two books, this one and the recent one by Philip Haney, See Something, Say Nothing - - and from what articles and news stories I've read, which these books derive from, they both have much to say which is valid.
Just as during the Clinton Administration, the leader of the Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Massoud, wasn't allowed in the USA to warn of an impending attack on US soil, while members of the Taliban were welcome here, including the Taliban jet pilot who lived in America while traveling back and forth to run bombing sorties against the Northern Alliance, and the Taliban were financed and armed in the 1990s by the CIA and Unocal, so too is what Bayoumi describing accurate.
Appears to be a most odd mixture of official behaviors going on today, just as at a recent Pentagon briefing several general officers admitted that $1 billion was spent in training Syrian so-called rebels, and only five rebels were the result [the other trainees, financed and armed from that $1 billion, returned to ISIS and/or al Qaeda!!!!!].
Plenty to write about on both sides of this issue!
LET US never forget in America how Julie Sirrs, the intrepid former analyst with the DIA, was run out of that agency for her stalwart work in attempting to warn of 9/11! Let us never forget the treatment of FBI agent Colleen Rowley, and others who attempted to warn of impending troubles!
Let us peruse this information and judge it wisely - - both books! [France recently shut down 20 mosques which preached Salafism - - and that was a wise action!]

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